August 7, 2014

Photographer Kirk Crippens in Museum Exhibition


September 13, 2014 - January 19, 2015
State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now, at Crystal Bridges Museum




Last October, Kirk Crippens received an ambiguous email request for a studio visit from the president of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Don Bacigalupi, and Curator Chad Alligood. At the time Crippens didn’t know what they were up to. It wasn’t until February that he discovered the reason for their visit, when he read a front page article in the New York Times about an exhibition Crystal Bridges was putting together.

A few months later Crystal Bridges had not only chosen sixteen photographs to be part of the exhibition State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now, but also wanted to collect Crippens’ entire portfolio of 41 prints: Foreclosure, USA


Kirk Crippens, Neighborhood, (part of Foreclosure USA), currently in the gallery


The Crystal Bridges website describes the show as "the ultimate road trip, to a thousand destinations, for one unforgettable exhibition. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art’s curatorial team hit the road to investigate what’s happening in American art today. Over the course of a year, the team logged more than 100,000 miles, crisscrossing the United States.
The journey began with a series of conversations with colleagues, curators, gallery owners, critics, and collectors who helped to generate a list of 10,000 artists. After narrowing the list, the Crystal Bridges team began making studio visits to 1,000 artists, all in search of the most compelling American art being created today.

The Museum sought to discover artists whose work has not yet been fully recognized on a national level. The result of this unprecedented journey is a one-of-a-kind exhibition that draws from every region of the US, offering an unusually diverse and nuanced look at American art. The exhibition will examine the myriad ways in which today’s artists are informed by the past and engaging deeply with issues relevant to our times.

State of the Art Discovering American Art Now, brings together the work of more than 100 artists in an unprecedented exploration of the power of today’s American art." 

The SFMOMA Artists Gallery has a number of Crippens’ photographs on display until August 21st, 2014. The photographs, from his series Portraitlandia are a break from the more weighty subject of foreclosure, capturing “the most interesting, iconic people” in Portland.


Kirk Crippens, Mary Kozlov, (part of Portlandia), currently on display in the gallery

The image above is part of the exhibit:

"How the Light Gets In: Bay Area Photo"

July 19 - August 21, 2014

SFMOMA Artists Gallery at Fort Mason
Fort Mason Center
2 Marina Boulevard, Building A
San FranciscoCA 94123


HOURS

Tuesday - Saturday 10:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.




Kirk Crippens, Tracts, (part of Foreclosure USA), currently in the gallery



Kirk Crippens, Thank You, (part of Foreclosure USA)



Kirk Crippens, Curtain Rod, (part of Foreclosure USA)











July 29, 2014

Klari Reis - video

In this video the talented Klari Reis shares her process and reveals what inspired her to start making these sculptures-like-paintings. With expoxy polymer (a UV resistant plastic similar to resin) she creates street landscapes, abstract patterns and many variations of petri dishes. This video produced by Marcelo Salinas also shows the mural she did for Microsoft Research Ltd, Cambridge, UK and the installation of 600 petri dishes for Clemson University, South Carolina.




Currently exhibited in the lobby of the Post Montgomery Center, here is a sculpture from our inventory:

Klari Reis, Petri Morph 2, 60"x60"

May 20, 2014

Doug Shoemaker, Watercolors: art of the ordinary



Interview with 
Doug Shoemaker


Showing June 7-July 3, 2014
Opening reception Saturday June 7, 3-5pm


Third St. Bridge


1. What made you paint rather than another expression? Could you have chosen sculpture too?

I began to paint pictures as a young boy and teenager, mostly pictures of barns, houses, trees and landscapes. They were simple paintings and even then in watercolor. I guess it was my way of communicating "look what I see out there, it's pretty interesting".

When I moved on to college to begin my degree in architecture, a number of my courses were focused on learning to draw realistically. It was an essential skill for an architect to learn. Some of those classes involved other media including watercolor, pastel, pencil and even oil.  The technique of watercolor grabbed my interest deeply, because of the simplicity of the medium, and, I felt, a natural way to illustrate realism in architectural illustration: shadows, textures, light and dark, perspective and materials. I can see in my work how those very basic skills still influence and are very much part of my work as a painter today.

I did also have classes in sculpture in architecture school, mostly to learn massing, shapes and forms related to model building. While it was interesting, my real love and passion and evolving skills naturally kept coming back to painting what I see.


Mare Island Tank




2. Your subjects are mundane objects and everyday landscapes. Do you think of the public when you paint?

I don’t really “think” about the public when I paint, but I perhaps wonder about their reaction to my work. Every artist does that, right? Certainly an artist cannot control or foresee what the viewer may feel toward the art, but I certainly am very interested as to their reaction. Some viewers may see my work as quite boring and of little interest, while others become fascinated with the richness that can come out of painting the ordinary. I suppose both are valid points of view.

A realist painter generally is very interested in the appearance of things, and then working out a way to express that observation, in a clear, identifiable way. The subjects of my work are very important. They form the very basis for why I put water and pigment to paper with my brush. Then it becomes the process of how to translate what I see and how to make it into a painting. I think the core of that process is traditional drawing, in my case, pencil on paper. I also don’t think of myself as a strict “photo-realist”; my work makes no attempt to hide brush strokes and marks on the paper while working to paint images often based on my own photography.


Balance




3. Your watercolor skills are amazing. Does your subject matter evolve from when you start painting? Or is your work more about improving your technique?

I continue to learn and evolve using watercolor as my medium of chose, but I am constantly amazed at how simple it is, yet allowing me to achieve the complexities and nuances, deep color saturation, and detail in my work. I tend to combine large areas of a color wash with detailed dry-brush technique, to build up the layering of the image on the paper. However, there is invariably always a point when my painting is in the early stages of layout, the colors are light, and detail has yet to be formed, and I look at the piece and it’s all wrong. Nothing seems to be working. I want to throw the piece out. Then I back up, take a break, stare at the piece for a while and jump back in. That’s the learning process, that’s how my technique improves. To quote the artist Chuck Close;

“Get yourself in trouble. If you get yourself in trouble, you don't have the answers. And if you don't have the answers, your solution will more likely be personal because no one else's solutions will seem appropriate. You'll have to come up with your own.”


Obviously, like many realist painters I use my camera as a major tool in the initial process. The camera is not as important as my brush and paper, but it does allow me to observe and retain many images that form the basis for my work. I don’t spend a lot of time composing a “perfect” image, but rather shoot somewhat randomly at subjects that appeal to me, those with strong forms, rich textures and colors, and of course, a strong aspect of sunlight and shadow.





Pool



4. Tell us how it feels to paint swimming pools or other water elements with watercolor. Is that a subject where the “architect” in you could disappear a little more?

I don’t think my work in painting pools is that different from a painting of a wall grazed with sunlight and deep shadows. The essence of my work is about organizing forms and shapes, as well as the placement of colors against other colors, or underneath other colors. A great deal of my work involves underpainting, beginning with the lightest colors first and gradually building up layer with richer and darker tones.  I suppose learning to be an architect is all about organizing the design, layout and completion of a complex object into a final piece of art. For me, watercolor painting is much the same thought process.

Additionally, my swimming pool series always involve elements of architecture or furniture in the background, forming the basis for reflections in the actual water. Even with my pool work where the elements of the water can be seen as free forming, loose and casual, there is still the organizational process in my technique to achieve that image.




5. Can you share with us a few painters who have had an influence on your work?

The work of Robert Bechtle has had an importance influence on my work, in that his work mainly deals with “ordinary” subject matter and he has worked a great deal in watercolor. For example, his watercolor “Albany Pinto”, 1973 has a wonderful, relaxed, contemplative mood about it as we see sunlight crossing a driveway with a rather simple suburban tract house in the background. My own watercolor “Desert Morning” attempts to capture those similar elements, attached:


Robert Bechtle Albany Pinto                                                             Doug Shoemaker  Desert Morning



The work of Edward Hopper has also taught me a great deal about realist painting, the quality of sunlight on a surface, and the strength we can see in ordinary architecture. His work often has a feel of melancholy and silence to the scene, at the same time (I feel) the presence of sunlight elates us. His work “Anderson’s House”, 1926 captures that feeling for me, and influenced my work entitled “Rear Window”, attached:

Edward Hopper Anderson's House                                             Doug Shoemaker Backyard Morning



















Other influences and great teachers of painting whom I admire and learn from include John Register, for his stillness and rooms of empty chairs; Andrew Wyeth for his rich textural gestures in watercolor capturing darkness and mood. In a certain way, these two artists were on my mind when I painted “Maui Shadows”, attached:


Andrew Wyeth Frozen Mill Race             John Register Green Chair         Doug Shoemaker Maui Shadows 















6. What do you think of these quotes?

“It is not the language of painters but the language of nature which one should listen to, the feeling for the things themselves, for reality is more important than the feeling for pictures”. Vincent Van Gogh

It’s an interesting quote, in that I largely subscribe to that idea. Before I even lay paint to paper, I am out observing the environment around me, looking closely at urban objects, surfaces and places that I deem worthy of a more intense focus. Again, it goes back to my basic belief that these “ordinary and mundane” objects and places, can, in fact, become extraordinary and artful.  I think by redefining them in painting, in my case, watercolor on paper, they become a focus, a composition of detail, texture, color and form. Maybe the viewer will come away from the work with a realization that art really begins by observing the environment all around us.


“It is a widely accepted notion among painters that it does not matter what one paints as long as it is well painted”. Mark Rothko

Well, for some painters that may be true, but not for me. The subject matter I choose is the essential beginning element to why I paint. My goal is then to paint these objects, places and things in a way that captures the ‘reality’ of them, the authenticity, while being clear that what the viewer is seeing is a watercolor on paper.







March 26, 2014

our 21st Annual Artists Warehouse Sale is coming up....!

A huge selection of original artworks at a savings of up to 75 percent!

                               Five Days Only: May 07 - 11, 2014

Be among the first to shop this annual sale, now in its 21st year. With two venues of over 7,000 square feet filled with works by 300 participating artists, it’s your first chance to purchase at incredible savings. Get an early access at the opening night admission: $10 at the door; free for SFMOMA members.



Opening night: 

Wed. May 07,
6:00 – 9:00 p.m.




Additional sale hours:

Thurs. May 08,
noon - 8:00
p.m.


Fri. May 09,
noon - 8:00 p.m.


Sat. May 10, noon - 5:30 p.m.

Sun. May 11,
noon - 4 p.m.









Shop this extraordinary five-day art sale and browse hundreds of artworks by a range of Bay Area artists at savings of up to 75 percent. Proceeds benefit participating artists, the Artists Gallery, and SFMOMA’s exhibitions and programs.


February 11, 2014

March-April 2014

The next exhibition is coming up!


Daniel Grant, Rachelle Reichert

March 8 – April 17, 2014

Opening reception: Saturday, March 8, 2014, 3:00 - 5:00 p.m
.

Daniel Grant, Draped, 2013; photo courtesy the artist
 
In the photographic series My Affair with Diana, Daniel Grant captures compelling vignettes of women using a Diana: a midcentury plastic camera embraced by contemporary artists for its simplicity of use, expressive results, and iconic square format. He used the same camera while traveling through the United States, Mexico, and Europe and found the photographs it produced favorably unpredictable: alternately crisp, then unfocused; moody, then stunning. These qualities prompted his use of the Diana for this photographic essay on the female form and the symbolic embodiment of the feminine as muse. The bodies he photographs morph from shadowed to brilliant, hard-edged to soft, as the arbitrary focus and pinhole vignettes characteristic of the camera lend at one moment a dramatic chiaroscuro and at another a dreamlike pictorialism. Equating the Diana with a lover, the series title hints at the shifting landscape of intimacy and implies that the greatest love affairs are those between artists and their work.


Daniel Grant, Callas, 2011; photo courtesy the artist




Rachelle Reichert, A Liminal Edge, 2013



Rachelle Reichert’s large-scale graphite drawings of figures and flowers reference seventeenth-century vanitas painting, Renaissance nudes, Dutch floral painting, and contemporary advertisements, responding to notions of beauty, desire, and the feminine in classical and modern culture. By obscuring and erasing female nudes, often with flowers piled over their heads or encroaching on their bodies from all sides, Reichert alludes to the homogenizing erasure effected by the pursuit of beauty and the fleeting nature of the ideal in the face of inevitable decay and death. Magnifying the material of drawing, Reichert includes abstract explorations of the medium of graphite, a dense form of carbon — essential to all of life, and that which remains after incineration. Seen side by side, her works expand and contract drawing from its traditional forms, moving from highly detailed figure and still-life works to conceptual and formal acts of drawing realized as sculpture, photography, and installation. In this body of work Reichert pushes beyond the edges of drawing to consider perception, materiality, and formation. She reveals elemental qualities of the artist’s creative process and the corresponding qualities in nature’s cycles of regeneration, perfection, decay, and death.
.


Rachelle Reichert, Untitled (Flower Drawing I) 2013

 



 
 
 
 

January 15, 2014

Let Me Re-Frame That


This is a short video that helps you think about how a work of art can be framed. Here at the SFMOMA Artists Gallery, we have several professional framers we recommend you work with to frame a piece you've purchased. This is the important final step that many people overlook, but it makes all the difference. Ask us for a referral. Below are some frames we’ve known and loved.






January 14, 2014

Blanc is an urban boutique experience merging modern design and classic architecture. A limited collection of 35 two- and three-bedroom residences with all the interior refinements you expect from this San Francisco architect. Steps from Polk Street and Union Square, Blanc is the centerpiece for San Francisco living.

Visitors to the property can experience Blanc's independent and modern SFMOMA Artists Gallery Pop-up inside the PENTHOUSE.

The Pop-up Gallery was organized by Michelle Nye, and features art created by local artists. The art was chosen to capture the essence of Blanc and San Francisco. If you fall in love with a piece of art, you may take it with you, as all of the art is for sale.

Michelle Nye has over thirteen years of experience advising individuals and businesses on Bay Area art selection and placement working as an Art Adviser at the SFMOMA Artists Gallery.


 
 

January 13, 2014

Jeff Bellerose Looks Down the Road


Painter Jeff Bellerose takes on the subject of the California freeway with great results.
 
 

January 10, 2014

January 2, 2014

Edith Hillinger, Sharon Shepherd, Elena Zolotnitsky

We are pleased to feature work by Edith Hillinger, Sharon Shepherd, and Elena Zolotnitsky in our first exhibition of 2014. 

Edith Hillinger, Sharon Shepherd, Elena Zolotnitsky
January 11 - February 20, 2014
Opening reception: Saturday, January 11, 2014
1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Edith Hillinger, an artist based in Berkeley, California, will show recent collages. Her Death Valley series is based on observations of the valley’s colorful mineral deposits and includes abstract forms reminiscent of patterns found in the work of the American Indians indigenous to that area. Hillinger also cites as influences archetypal motifs, such as the zigzag that has been used from the time of the Hittites to the present day, as well as patterns found in Aboriginal and African art.

Sharon Shepherd will exhibit recent paintings. An active studio artist based in San Francisco for over three decades, she has developed an articulate and distinctive painterly vocabulary, boldly exploring the possibilities of abstraction in works that feature multi-textured surfaces and layers.

While she identifies herself as a figurative artist, Elena Zolotnitsky is quick to acknowledge that her primary impulse is to pursue the formal aspects of painting. She uses oil on canvas, board, or paper, often incorporating gold leaf. The resulting works are refined explorations of volume, hue, and texture that portray people during their private time at home.



Edith Hillinger, Death Valley Sunset, 2013; photo: Jeannie O'Connor


Elena Zolotnitsky, La Dolce Vita, 2005-8, photo: Russel Kiehn 


Sharon Shepherd, Sweetness of Jasmine, 2013: photo: Laird Rodet


 

December 20, 2013

Happy Holidays!

Happy Holidays from the SFMOMA Artists Gallery!
The gallery will be closed from December 22 - January 1.
 
Misako Miki, Things Don't Last Forever, 2009

December 4, 2013

SFMOMA Artists Gallery - Work of Robert OGATA


 
Great new video about Robert Ogata that highlights his current exhibition at the SFMOMA Artists Gallery as well as his work and process. Produced by Marcelo Salinas; interview and photography by Matthew O'Brien.
 

November 26, 2013

Last Exhibition of 2013

Be sure to check out our last exhibition of 2013 featuring the work of Robert Ogata and Amanda Boe. This exhibition is on view from November 9 - December 20. Opening reception: Saturday, November 9, 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.


Robert Ogata, Splice 3, 2013; photo: courtesy of Michael Karibian


Robert Katsusuke Ogata and Amanda Boe

Robert Katsusuke Ogata (b. 1934), a painter based in Fresno, California, will show ten recent large-scale paintings created between 2012 and 2013, along with smaller works on paper dating from 1992. The majority of the work is from a series he calls Splice, in which he employs chalk as well as gesso, polymer, and paintstick. Works in the series revisit some of Ogata’s favorite motifs, including New Year’s ceremonial mochi (Japanese confection) and the peony. San Francisco–based photographer

Amanda Boe (b. 1978) will exhibit eleven digital chromogenic prints from a series entitled What I Hold Dear. These works, dating from 2009 to the present, include photographs of landscapes and interior spaces from South Dakota and California. In this personal narrative, Boe explores her connection to home through the convergence of these two disparate places.


Amanda Boe, Path Off Highway 1, 2009


October 29, 2013

SFMOMA Artists Gallery video

The SFMOMA Artists Gallery is pleased to be the featured subject in this new video, courtesy of Marcelo Salinas and Matthew O'Brien.

October 21, 2013

Amazon.com Storefront

We are very excited to announce the SFMOMA Artists Gallery storefront on Amazon.com! Our current selection includes art work by ten Bay Area artists and we look forward to adding more in the near future.


October 15, 2013

Client Portfolios page on SFMOMA Artists Gallery website

We are excited about the recent launch of our new Client Portfolios page on the SFMOMA Artists Gallery website. Each portfolio includes photographs of client spaces with samples of installed artworks.

Our knowledgeable curators can suggest groupings such as these and others based on the needs of your project. To set up a complimentary consultation with one of our art advisers, please contact us at artistsgallery@sfmoma.org or 415.441.4777.

 

Featured artist: Silvia Poloto, Flock 2, 2010 and Lullaby 2, 2012; photo: courtesy the SFMOMA Artists Gallery

October 1, 2013

Video for James Torlakson and William Farley exhibition



Check out this new video about the work of James Torlakson and William Farley! The exhibition is on view through October 24. Many thanks to Marcelo Salinas and Matthew O'Brien for this fanastic video.

August 19, 2013

James Torlakson, William Farley

We are pleased to announce our next exhibition featuring work by James Torlakson and William Farley. The exhibition will be on view from September 7 - October 24. Please join us for the opening reception on Saturday, Septmber 7 from 1:00-3:00 p.m.

James Torlakson, Halloween, 2012; photo: courtesy of the artist

With a professional career that has spanned four decades, James Torlakson may be best known for his photo-based realism, though working from life is still an active part of his creative process. His imagery has centered on everyday America, shifting over the years to include trucks, railways, amusement parks, waterfronts, fireworks booths, deserted drive-in theaters, and coastal landscapes.

Torlakson explains: "Often I am pointing out things that would be bypassed as mundane or very ordinary, therefore not normal fodder for aesthetic attention. Given a personal and honest perspective, most anything is worthy of consideration." For the upcoming exhibition, Torlakson will show several oil paintings, including Halloween, a recent large work depicting his children trick-or-treating.

In the photographs of his Fog at Night series, William Farley explores natural and man-made environments. These have a dimension of expectation to them, similar to the atmosphere surrounding a movie set, where some dramatic human behavior has just taken place or is about to begin. He photographs urban and rural landscapes absent of their inhabitants, where the elementals seem visible and available to be recorded.

Farley calls this work an exploration of his belief that the photographic image "has the potential to reach beyond the rational mind to our innate understanding of the mysterious beauty of the material world."

William Farley, Three Lanes, 2009; photo courtesy of the artist
 

August 10, 2013

The Ghost Below

Judith & Richard Lang continue to investigate plastic pollution through their collaborative artwork via theghostbelow.org, an interactive website that engages, educates, and inspires visitors. They have kindly provided the background on this project and we are pleased to feature it here on our blog:

 “Thanks to the savvy media folks at Swirl, The Ghost Below is an incredible website that features parallax scrolling that seems to animate the casting of the net and the descent into the ocean depths. This cool effect uses multiple backgrounds which seem to move at different speeds to create a sensation of depth (creating a faux-3D effect) and an interesting browsing experience. 

It feels like a deep dive into The Ghost Below world. It's engaging visually with the embedded videos and commentary. It keeps attention on the great information to be gleaned. Yes, there is asking for funds to continue the MMC's main task as an animal recovery hospital, but most importantly it is a call to action. Question # 1 when we give talks is -- "how do we clean up the mess "out there?"

There is no cleaning it up. The gushing hose of plastic trash needs to be turned off. The most important of the 4 R's: reduce reuse recycle refuse is REFUSE.  Stop using single-use plastic. So there is a panel in the site to make a promise---"I will not take a plastic bag from the grocery store, I will bring my own bag, I will not use plastic straws, I will bring my own cup, my own fork,  I will not buy pre-packaged food, etc." A promise made---sticks. The information about The Ghost Below is great but only action will effect change. Call to action is a good model.

In addition to action promises, The Ghost Below is a call to let the imagination surface. What we don't know, what we deny has a powerful force once it's in the light of day. To make visible what we deny (here, the oceanic load of plastic--nets & trash) sparks new thinking about our problems so we may begin the task every artist knows "show-don't tell"

The Indra's Net sculpture is a device for "catching" the promises hung from the net itself. Hand written messages flutter in the wind while the planet floats and rolls in the net.




 
The duty of the net (real and virtual) is to gather up the energy of promises and involvement. We feel the sea to be a source of nourishment both for the body and spirit—a great god in need of our collective propitiation. The ghost below can be a scary image, the unknown lurking. But in truth, it can be the source of creative imagination if we let it, honoring the mystery of what we don't know. 

After many months and months of meetings, numerous conference calls and untold emails, we are thrilled that finally the site is launched. Swirl has done the design and layout of the site and has the technical expertise to bring the site to life. We have been working with them to provide content and have been involved with lots of tweaking to make sure that the messaging is correct. 

We usually are a team of two. Our collaboration between us is from the "is you is, or is you ain't" school. Together the two of us can get quick turn-around but we now know, to work with so many voices, with Swirl and TMMC has brought light and richness to the depths of the ghost below. And, in the end, all the voices had impact and made for a super installation and now websites.”

Judith and Richard Lang

For more about Judith and Richard’s beach plastic project: 

For more about Judith and Richard’s adventures both on and off the beach:

July 2, 2013

Independence Day

Happy 4th of July! The gallery will be closed on Independence Day, but please come by and visit us again soon.


Inez Storer, Americans, 2013